Posts Tagged ‘Salman Khan’

Bishnois’ design for life

More than 500 years ago a forward-thinking man, aged just 34 years, created a code that has become a religious way of life for a community of around a million people. 

Painting of Guru Jambheshwar Ji

Guru Jambheshwar Ji, innovative founder of the Bishnoi religion

Originator Lord Jambheshwar founded the Bishnoi creed upon 29 principles, which explains a name derived from the words ‘bis’ meaning twenty and ‘nau’ nine.  With firm roots in Hinduism, Bishnois have maintained many traditions and regard Guru Jamboji, his broadly used title, as an incarnation of the god Vishnu, the sustainer.  Nonetheless Bishnoism has marked adaptations from its parent religion, like burial rather than cremation – a particularly constructive selection in the arid Thar Desert where tree preservation is paramount.

Bishnois are renowned for their care for animals, trees and the environment.  In the last 10 years they have received much media attention in India following the misdemeanor of Salman Khan, a popular Bollywood actor who was caught hunting gazelle and black buck.  The Bishnois exposed his crimes and ensured that he was brought to justice, playing a leading role in the trial.  They shrewdly used the attention surrounding the incident to raise the profile of desert conservation and demonstrate their intolerance towards anyone who disregards nature or the law. 

Within the 29 principles, Bishnois are commanded to care for wildlife, never cut green trees, provide common shelters for animals that would be slaughtered and only eat vegetarian food.  Consequently, their name has become synonymous with conservation and the religion is regarded by many as the world’s first environmentalist doctrine.

Bishnoi man feeding millet to chinkara

Bishnoi scattering millet to feed wild gazelles

Many people comment that gazelles, or chinkaras, tend to congregate around Bishnoi villages because they feel safe there.  They are easy to spot around the communities and, though typically shy, allow people within a few metres without becoming nervous.  Could this confidence be a result of Bishnoi kindness? 

Indeed whilst living with a Bishnoi family my bedroom has become a kind of nature reserve.  First came my least favourite, the crickets, whose strumming echoes dramatically off the stone walls throughout the night, next was the lizard, who eats crickets, then a pair of sparrows, who cause little bother nesting in the light fitting, and finally some mice living under the hard wooden bed.  The mice, which do have a nocturnal gnawing habit, made me wonder how Bishnois cope with infestations and pests.  What happens when wild creatures cause inconvenience and damage?  Compromise is not an option; humane traps can be used to relocate creatures but a true Bishnoi will never intentionally kill or harm any living animal.  Using my room as an example, I was also fascinated to see that Bishnois do not osteracise the natural world to the outdoors like we do.  There is a western attitude that creatures are fine outside but a troublesome pest once indoors.  Thinking about it here, it seems irrational, particularly as most animals are afraid of, or uninterested in, humans.  Here nature is as free as we are, and if they roam into the house that is their prerogative.

Bishnoi woman wearing traditional clothing and jewellery

My host's mother dressed in traditional clothing and jewellery

There are distinguishing clothing and jewellery used by Bishnois so it is easy to identify their communities when you know how. 

Red, black & white print on Bishnoi skirt

Distinctive design on Bishnoi skirts

Most noticeable is a printed design used solely for Bishnoi women’s skirts, complemented by unique types of jewellery, such as a marital pendent worn on the forehead, a big half moon shaped nose ring and a large rectangular gold plate on the chest.  Men are much more simply dressed, normally just wearing white lungis, tunic and turban, or pagari. 

Bishnois try not to be fond of material possessions.  However, a woman’s gold jewellery is an exception because it is given as a gift at marriage, when she goes to join the house of her father-in-law.  Money is not endowed because it is easily frittered and wasted, whereas gold is a long-lasting investment.

Cleanliness also features highly in the 29 principles, with rules about taking an early morning bath, washing before eating, drinking clean filtered water and a monthly religious day called amavasya, devoted to internal and external cleansing.   It takes place each moonless night and is typified by a day of rest from all work.  One main aspect of the day is a type of fast whereby no heavy food is consumed, only raw fruit and veg.  Elsewhere this is recognisable as a vogue detox recommended by elite dieticians and nutritionists, here it has been part of the religious code for hundreds of years.   Scientific by design, it is understood that the moon controls our digestive system, like it controls the tides, so fasting on this day helps to cleanse the body.  Rest also ensures that every individual has time for reflection, spiritual contemplation and internal cleansing at least once a month.

Fundamental moral codes are also covered in Guru Jambheshwar’s 29 principles, as addressed by most world religions, including avoiding telling lies, deterring theft, promoting forgiveness and refraining from intoxicant use, specifically prohibiting smoking, alcohol and opium use.  The benefits of which are easy for us to comprehend even if we do not choose to practice. 

Cooking chipatis over an open fire

Where lifestyles are so different, we can't automatically understand everything

Some Bishnoi principles are not so easily understood by foreigners to the culture of the harsh desert climate for which they were designed.  Admittedly, when I first read the 29 principles, there were some that I could only identify as being slightly eccentric.  For example, one rule prohibits wearing the colour blue and another keeps women away from household chores for 5 days during her menstrual period.  The more deeply I understand the culture and context, the more I realise that these rules were created with exceptional common sense as well as profound perception.  Over the coming months, I will delve into the detail and convey ways for outsiders to connect understanding to the more unusual tenets.  If you’re interested, read the 29 principles – just remember to keep an open mind.

Taken as a whole, Lord Jamboji’s 29 principles form a complete practical guide for harmonious living, not only with the nature but also for physical, psychological and social well-being too.  It is a simple, doable way to lead a good life, tailored for the farmers of the Thar desert.  Most people will know the term ‘sustainable living’ and, in the UK, it is generally perceived as a marketeers buzz phrase to make us feel that we’re doing our bit to combat ‘environmental issues’.  Here the environment is not seen as a problem.  Sustainable living is just part of a happy, healthy life, not a source of sacrifice.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: