Posts Tagged ‘Prosopis cineraria’

Super Tree!

The Khejri, Prosopis cineraria, will give any wilderness survival expert a run for his money.  In an environment that endures as little as 100mm rainfall each year, competition for water is the game.  For Khejri, winning is easy.  It is capable of lodging roots 30 metres into the ground and accessing water obscured from the grasps of animals and other plants alike.  Withstanding great variation in temperatures, it easily copes with summer heat in the 50⁰C range and winter nights that can bottom at around 0⁰C.  Almost evergreen and thriving in the harshest of conditions, it is a super species, with all the stamina, vigor and resilience of a great warrior. 
Huge, untouched Khejri tree
A Khejri or Prosopis Cineraria

Like a true hero, it is patient benefactor, generously giving shade from the pitiless heat of the sun, feeding our animals, providing fruits fit for our consumption, releasing nitrogen for our soil, stabilising dunes, medicating the weak, fuelling our fires and supplying the most sophisticated air-pollution filtration system known to man.  Over the years this old combatant has seen its surroundings change, as wilderness gives way to rising agriculture, political systems ebb and flow under the weight of oppressive regimes, industrialisation and mechanization.  It patiently stands by as many human lifetimes pass before its eyes and we increasingly reap the gifts that Khejri gives to us but provide it with nothing in return.

Back in 1485 AD, this was recognised by a prolific leader named Guru Jambheshwar, or Jambhoji, who understood its importance and made his followers swear never to cut green trees.  These people, the Bishnoi community, have faithfully devoted themselves to this cause and vehemently protect all green trees, especially Khejri.  The most famous and astounding story is that of Amrita Devi, which took place in the year 1730 AD.  Stop anywhere near Jodhpur and you will find this story has become a legend, proudly disclosed by all communities to tourists and stoppers by. 

Painting of Amita Devri found at the Bishnoi Village Camp near Khejarli

Painting of Amita Devri found at the Bishnoi Village Camp near Khejarli

So it is told, the Maharaja of the area had plans to build a princely palace and needed a substantial quantity of firewood to produce lime.  He sent forth his forces to a large population of Khejri trees, in Khejarli, to cut them down.  Amrita Devi, a loyal Bishnoi mother versed in the teachings of Jambhoji, faced the soldiers and proclaimed that anyone wishing to cut a tree would have to first cut through her.  Weaponless in her protection of the trees, it is said that she hugged the nearest Khejri, forcing the axe-wielding soldiers to cut through her neck.  Incensed at the loss of tree and fellow compatriot, villagers came from all around to face the Maharaja’s army.  By the end of the massacre, 363 Bishnois had given their lives in sacrifice to save green trees.  Appalled at the situation and overwhelmed by the dedication of the villagers, the Maharaja passed a decree legally protecting green trees, which stands to this day.  Furthermore, it is highly likely that the term ‘tree hugger’ originated 280 years ago when Amrita Devi demonstrated a mother’s love for our hero, the Khejri tree.

 

In modern times the tree is not simply threatened by people intent on destruction for firewood.  It is the bearer of a crueler ill, falling victim at the hands of farmers who are unintentionally harming their protector.  Of the gifts donated by Khejri, there is a vital foodstuff for domestic animals known as ‘Loong’.  In addition to providing feed in times of scarcity, Loong is highly nutritious, increasing both the quality and quantity of milk yield in cows, buffalo and goats. 

Camel Cart being loaded with Khejri

Lopping provides both Loong and firewood

Another repercussion, only identified in the last few years, shows that lopping also creates an ideal habitat for invasive beetle larvae.  Species such as Gahen, Derolus discicollis, which are huge beetles, bore into the open shoot or branch and lay their eggs.  Growing larvae need lots of nutrients and extract these from their host, the Khejri tree, further weakening its condition.

The Arid Forest Research Institute (AFRI) in Jodhpur kindly permitted me to accompany them on a research mission to assess mortality rates in the Khejri population.  It was fascinating day, not least because the AFRI Khejri specialists are a diverse and knowledgeable crew of experts.  We visited several farms, quantifying tree populations, assessing the incidence of infection and causes of death in each.  While the team collected samples for analysis, it gave me time to gauge the considerable share drying out from the top branches downwards, all at varying stages of dilapidation.  Hanging off many trees were mushroom-like growths, the trees were not just under attack from shoot-boring beetles but fungi causing heart rot and root damage too.  AFRI experts earmarked healthy trees for further scrutiny, in the hope that some form of immunity could be identified, and took samples for lab analysis from deceased trees.  Although there were undoubtedly pockets of healthy, undamaged trees in view, farmers typically reported that they were loosing between 1 and 5 trees per year.  They were confounded by the loss and could not understand the cause, let alone administer treatment.  Care alone can be woefully inadequate where knowledge is not available, especially in remote farming communities with high illiteracy.

Painting of the Khejarli massacre displayed inside the temple

Bishnois: Passion for wildlife protection and ready to fight for it.

Naturally, in depth analysis of deceased Khejri means that one had to be uprooted, which happened to take place in a Bishnoi-owned farm.  No sooner had men begun to expose the roots with shovels than a greyed, weather-worn lady came approaching at implausible speed.  She was furious, spitting out protestations in her native tongue, Marwari.  It took some time for her husband and the team of experts to calm her down, explaining that the tree had already expired with no chance of recovery, that the scientists mean no harm and only wanted to help solve the problem.  Despite the eccentricity of the situation, I was greatly encouraged to see that the Bishnoi were not simply legendary idealists but still actively impassioned about wildlife protection and ready to fight for it.
Lopped Khejri tree just starting to reshoot

Lopped Khejri tree grappling to produce new shoots and leaves

 

Khejri is the treasured state tree of Rajasthan and sacredly embodies the divinity of nature for the Bishnoi, so it is not short of care from supporters.  However, under siege from ignorance, overuse, root borers, shoot borers, fungus and inhibition of its natural functions, will this be enough?  Dr Ahmed, AFRI expert, explains “Farmers need to be educated about the perils of lopping and receive remuneration for the loss of an essential animal fodder source.  Excessive agricultural mechanisation also causes problems; it does not allow the slow growing Khejri saplings time to take root.  In turn this means that we are also contemplating these problems in the context of an ageing Khejri population.” 

In mythological stories of super heroes and far-fetched odds, the protagonist comes alarmingly close to perishing at the hands of wrong doers.  In these dearly loved tales the champion always conquers in the end, albeit with a few friendly nudges in the right direction.  The Khejri now hangs on this precipice, the part in the story where the situation is seemingly bleak.  The question is whether this treasured great warrior will continue to be the king of survival experts and recover from persecution.  We are its trusty sidekicks and have a responsibility to ensure the Khejri’s survival by spreading branches of awareness as far as we can reach.  If only trees could talk!

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